در ایران یک خبرنگار منتقد بودن به معنای زیستن با اتهاماتی همچون مزدگیر دولتهای خارجی است

در ایران یک خبرنگار منتقد بودن به معنای زیستن با اتهاماتی همچون مزدگیر دولتهای خارجی است

‎'UN Summit on human rights and democracy award given to My Stealthy Freedom Page
The speech In Geneva Summit
Thank you, Geneva Summit for this award, which I accept in the name of the thousands and thousands of Iranian women who are protesting the heartless compulsory hijab rules in Iran.
To be honest, i was very nervous to come here and accept this award. Why? because when you are Iranian and work on human rights issues, the Government says you are working with Israeli, American or British secret service. To be a critical journalist in iran means living with the accusation that you are in the pay of a foreign government.
But what better place than here where we can criticise all who abuse human rights, be they in the US, Israel, or Iran.
I am from Iran, a country which I know best...
****
You may have seen pictures of Michele Obama in Saudi Arabia with her hair uncovered. And this caused a media storm across the globe.
Now, let me share a secret – If Michele Obama went to Iran, she better cover her hair or she won't be allowed get through passport control. Now, because she is the first lady, she will not end up in prison but she will be deported.
That is because no woman in Iran can be seen in public with her hair uncovered.
Now I keep hearing from some people that Iran has bigger problems.
Since 2009 I have covered big problems too, I interviewed the families of more than 50 people who were killed during protests against the fraud in the 2009 presidential elections.
For a long while, all I was doing was writing about death and execution and imprisonment of political activists.
But when I hear why make a fuss over this piece of cloth, I say that this piece of cloth is a big issue too.
this piece of cloth in the hands of those politicians who do not believe in freedom, has become a chain around the necks of Iranian women and over the past 35 years has choked their vitality and energy.
According to Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, Chief of Iran's national police, just last year the security forces issued warnings to 3.6 million women about their bad hijab.
Eighteen thousand women were arrested and sent to the courts. Of course, the police don't keep statistics on how many women were kicked or punched or slapped because of their bad hijab.
This piece of cloth, in the hands of a regime that has made compulsory hijab into the law of the land, is an instrument of oppression against women.
compulsory hijab is affecting half of the population in Iran. You might assume that many of Iranian women believe in Hijab but let me tell you my story to show you how compulsory hijab can 
impact the lives of all Iranian women – both with or without hijab.
I was born in a small village to a traditional and religious family. All my family supported the Islamic republic. My father and two brothers fought in the war against Iraq.
My mother always wore the hijab, as did my sister, my aunts, and in fact all the women in my family.
From the age of seven I wore the compulsory head scarf, like millions of Iranian girls. When you grow up in such a society, compulsory hijab becomes part of your body, your identity. You cannot easily remove it.
it feels like you are cutting off a part of yourself.
And So, When I left Iran in 2009 for the UK, I still couldn't take My headscarf off in public.
It is not easy to take it off when removing the hijab becomes a question of honor, a family's good name.
So the person who is addressing you here is not some Western woman. I am someone who have gone through a long process to arrive here. Let me stress: I am not against THE hijab.
What I am against is compulsion…compulsory hijab creates division in families and in society. And these rules create tensions in society.
The compulsory hijab also affects the men — it is an insult to men that they cannot control their basic urges if they were to see a single strand of a woman’s hair.
In my country if you are not muslim if you are just a tourist you have no choice but to wear the hijab.
This should not be a secret but I really love my country. And it breaks my heart every time when I have to talk about the ugly parts …
the truth is Iran is a beautiful country but the government has imposed harsh conditions on women, treating them as second class citizens.
And today, although I am free from compulsory Hijab, it’s too hard for me to ignore the women who do not have that same freedom.
“Whenever in a free country the wind dances through my hair, I remember that this hair has been a hostage in the hands of Iranian regime for over 30 years.”
Last May, I started a Facebook page called My Stealthy Freedom. It was an opportunity for Iranian women to post their photos on this page without a headscarf or a hijab. The page has been hugely popular and has reached millions of people.
My Stealthy Freedom Facebook page Now has become the loudest voice against Hijab. We are not stealthy any more.
Ordinary photos from ordinary women; these women are not in the seat of power, women who were not politically active, women from cities and villages..women from all over Iran.
For those used to seeing Iranian women covered head to toe in a black veil, My Stealthy Freedom page shows another face of Iran.
The voice of Iranian women has been heard by the global media – newspapers and TV stations around the world have covered My Stealthy Freedom...
But the media in Iran have attacked these women on my stealthy freedom and even myself.
Iran state TV have reported in a news program that I was raped by 3 men after walking naked in streets of London!
You want to know what was the reaction of our politician?
No Iranian politician dares to support us.
Compulsory hijab is the one subject that all Iranian politicians agree on. It doesn't matter if they are reformist or conservative, moderate or hardline.
They all believe that those who object against forced hijab are breaking the law.
You want to know what was the reaction of the foreign politicians orotund the world?
No foreign politicians dares to support us.
It is rare for western politicians meeting with their Iranian counterparts to take up the cause of Iranian women.
because they believe objecting against forced hijab is breaking the law too.
What's even worse is that whenever a female politician from the West visits Iran, she conforms to the compulsory hijab rules. From Catherine Ashton to female officials from Sweden, Italy, Norway they all put on the hijab and they think they respect the culture of Iran. You really think that forcing women to wear hijab is our culture?
I am not suggesting that female politicians should interfere in Iran’s internal matters. But they should be aware that a significant part of Iranian women are rejecting this compulsory hijab.
You know, when Iranian officials visit a non-Islamic country, they insist that no alcohol be served at official dinners and their accompanying female team are in full hijab. No one in the West would dream of asking them to remove their hijabs to conform to Western norms.
So, why is it that when women officials from the west go to Iran they meekly accept hijab rules?
I am grateful for this award.
But I want to challenge western leaders who deal with Iranian officials to bring up the issue of Women's rights in Iran. I want female politicians to protest against compulsory hijab when they visit Iran. I want you to stand up for the dignity and the rights of Iranian women.
Some of you might say that Hijab is required by the law in Iran. But slavery used to be legal too. If no one had objected, then slavery would still be with us today.
Let us be in no doubt – Nowedays forcing women to wear compulsory hijab is discriminatory and it is unfair.
Like the leaders of the American civil rights movement, like Martin Luther King, we the women of my land also have a dream — we dream that one day our voice gets heard, the world stand up with us and compulsory hijab leaves Iran for ever.
Thank you,
Photos by: 
Oliver O'Hanlon
Masih Alinejad:'‎
‎'UN Summit on human rights and democracy award given to My Stealthy Freedom Page
The speech In Geneva Summit
Thank you, Geneva Summit for this award, which I accept in the name of the thousands and thousands of Iranian women who are protesting the heartless compulsory hijab rules in Iran.
To be honest, i was very nervous to come here and accept this award. Why? because when you are Iranian and work on human rights issues, the Government says you are working with Israeli, American or British secret service. To be a critical journalist in iran means living with the accusation that you are in the pay of a foreign government.
But what better place than here where we can criticise all who abuse human rights, be they in the US, Israel, or Iran.
I am from Iran, a country which I know best...
****
You may have seen pictures of Michele Obama in Saudi Arabia with her hair uncovered. And this caused a media storm across the globe.
Now, let me share a secret – If Michele Obama went to Iran, she better cover her hair or she won't be allowed get through passport control. Now, because she is the first lady, she will not end up in prison but she will be deported.
That is because no woman in Iran can be seen in public with her hair uncovered.
Now I keep hearing from some people that Iran has bigger problems.
Since 2009 I have covered big problems too, I interviewed the families of more than 50 people who were killed during protests against the fraud in the 2009 presidential elections.
For a long while, all I was doing was writing about death and execution and imprisonment of political activists.
But when I hear why make a fuss over this piece of cloth, I say that this piece of cloth is a big issue too.
this piece of cloth in the hands of those politicians who do not believe in freedom, has become a chain around the necks of Iranian women and over the past 35 years has choked their vitality and energy.
According to Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, Chief of Iran's national police, just last year the security forces issued warnings to 3.6 million women about their bad hijab.
Eighteen thousand women were arrested and sent to the courts. Of course, the police don't keep statistics on how many women were kicked or punched or slapped because of their bad hijab.
This piece of cloth, in the hands of a regime that has made compulsory hijab into the law of the land, is an instrument of oppression against women.
compulsory hijab is affecting half of the population in Iran. You might assume that many of Iranian women believe in Hijab but let me tell you my story to show you how compulsory hijab can 
impact the lives of all Iranian women – both with or without hijab.
I was born in a small village to a traditional and religious family. All my family supported the Islamic republic. My father and two brothers fought in the war against Iraq.
My mother always wore the hijab, as did my sister, my aunts, and in fact all the women in my family.
From the age of seven I wore the compulsory head scarf, like millions of Iranian girls. When you grow up in such a society, compulsory hijab becomes part of your body, your identity. You cannot easily remove it.
it feels like you are cutting off a part of yourself.
And So, When I left Iran in 2009 for the UK, I still couldn't take My headscarf off in public.
It is not easy to take it off when removing the hijab becomes a question of honor, a family's good name.
So the person who is addressing you here is not some Western woman. I am someone who have gone through a long process to arrive here. Let me stress: I am not against THE hijab.
What I am against is compulsion…compulsory hijab creates division in families and in society. And these rules create tensions in society.
The compulsory hijab also affects the men — it is an insult to men that they cannot control their basic urges if they were to see a single strand of a woman’s hair.
In my country if you are not muslim if you are just a tourist you have no choice but to wear the hijab.
This should not be a secret but I really love my country. And it breaks my heart every time when I have to talk about the ugly parts …
the truth is Iran is a beautiful country but the government has imposed harsh conditions on women, treating them as second class citizens.
And today, although I am free from compulsory Hijab, it’s too hard for me to ignore the women who do not have that same freedom.
“Whenever in a free country the wind dances through my hair, I remember that this hair has been a hostage in the hands of Iranian regime for over 30 years.”
Last May, I started a Facebook page called My Stealthy Freedom. It was an opportunity for Iranian women to post their photos on this page without a headscarf or a hijab. The page has been hugely popular and has reached millions of people.
My Stealthy Freedom Facebook page Now has become the loudest voice against Hijab. We are not stealthy any more.
Ordinary photos from ordinary women; these women are not in the seat of power, women who were not politically active, women from cities and villages..women from all over Iran.
For those used to seeing Iranian women covered head to toe in a black veil, My Stealthy Freedom page shows another face of Iran.
The voice of Iranian women has been heard by the global media – newspapers and TV stations around the world have covered My Stealthy Freedom...
But the media in Iran have attacked these women on my stealthy freedom and even myself.
Iran state TV have reported in a news program that I was raped by 3 men after walking naked in streets of London!
You want to know what was the reaction of our politician?
No Iranian politician dares to support us.
Compulsory hijab is the one subject that all Iranian politicians agree on. It doesn't matter if they are reformist or conservative, moderate or hardline.
They all believe that those who object against forced hijab are breaking the law.
You want to know what was the reaction of the foreign politicians orotund the world?
No foreign politicians dares to support us.
It is rare for western politicians meeting with their Iranian counterparts to take up the cause of Iranian women.
because they believe objecting against forced hijab is breaking the law too.
What's even worse is that whenever a female politician from the West visits Iran, she conforms to the compulsory hijab rules. From Catherine Ashton to female officials from Sweden, Italy, Norway they all put on the hijab and they think they respect the culture of Iran. You really think that forcing women to wear hijab is our culture?
I am not suggesting that female politicians should interfere in Iran’s internal matters. But they should be aware that a significant part of Iranian women are rejecting this compulsory hijab.
You know, when Iranian officials visit a non-Islamic country, they insist that no alcohol be served at official dinners and their accompanying female team are in full hijab. No one in the West would dream of asking them to remove their hijabs to conform to Western norms.
So, why is it that when women officials from the west go to Iran they meekly accept hijab rules?
I am grateful for this award.
But I want to challenge western leaders who deal with Iranian officials to bring up the issue of Women's rights in Iran. I want female politicians to protest against compulsory hijab when they visit Iran. I want you to stand up for the dignity and the rights of Iranian women.
Some of you might say that Hijab is required by the law in Iran. But slavery used to be legal too. If no one had objected, then slavery would still be with us today.
Let us be in no doubt – Nowedays forcing women to wear compulsory hijab is discriminatory and it is unfair.
Like the leaders of the American civil rights movement, like Martin Luther King, we the women of my land also have a dream — we dream that one day our voice gets heard, the world stand up with us and compulsory hijab leaves Iran for ever.
Thank you,
Photos by: 
Oliver O'Hanlon
Masih Alinejad:'‎
‎'UN Summit on human rights and democracy award given to My Stealthy Freedom Page
The speech In Geneva Summit
Thank you, Geneva Summit for this award, which I accept in the name of the thousands and thousands of Iranian women who are protesting the heartless compulsory hijab rules in Iran.
To be honest, i was very nervous to come here and accept this award. Why? because when you are Iranian and work on human rights issues, the Government says you are working with Israeli, American or British secret service. To be a critical journalist in iran means living with the accusation that you are in the pay of a foreign government.
But what better place than here where we can criticise all who abuse human rights, be they in the US, Israel, or Iran.
I am from Iran, a country which I know best...
****
You may have seen pictures of Michele Obama in Saudi Arabia with her hair uncovered. And this caused a media storm across the globe.
Now, let me share a secret – If Michele Obama went to Iran, she better cover her hair or she won't be allowed get through passport control. Now, because she is the first lady, she will not end up in prison but she will be deported.
That is because no woman in Iran can be seen in public with her hair uncovered.
Now I keep hearing from some people that Iran has bigger problems.
Since 2009 I have covered big problems too, I interviewed the families of more than 50 people who were killed during protests against the fraud in the 2009 presidential elections.
For a long while, all I was doing was writing about death and execution and imprisonment of political activists.
But when I hear why make a fuss over this piece of cloth, I say that this piece of cloth is a big issue too.
this piece of cloth in the hands of those politicians who do not believe in freedom, has become a chain around the necks of Iranian women and over the past 35 years has choked their vitality and energy.
According to Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, Chief of Iran's national police, just last year the security forces issued warnings to 3.6 million women about their bad hijab.
Eighteen thousand women were arrested and sent to the courts. Of course, the police don't keep statistics on how many women were kicked or punched or slapped because of their bad hijab.
This piece of cloth, in the hands of a regime that has made compulsory hijab into the law of the land, is an instrument of oppression against women.
compulsory hijab is affecting half of the population in Iran. You might assume that many of Iranian women believe in Hijab but let me tell you my story to show you how compulsory hijab can 
impact the lives of all Iranian women – both with or without hijab.
I was born in a small village to a traditional and religious family. All my family supported the Islamic republic. My father and two brothers fought in the war against Iraq.
My mother always wore the hijab, as did my sister, my aunts, and in fact all the women in my family.
From the age of seven I wore the compulsory head scarf, like millions of Iranian girls. When you grow up in such a society, compulsory hijab becomes part of your body, your identity. You cannot easily remove it.
it feels like you are cutting off a part of yourself.
And So, When I left Iran in 2009 for the UK, I still couldn't take My headscarf off in public.
It is not easy to take it off when removing the hijab becomes a question of honor, a family's good name.
So the person who is addressing you here is not some Western woman. I am someone who have gone through a long process to arrive here. Let me stress: I am not against THE hijab.
What I am against is compulsion…compulsory hijab creates division in families and in society. And these rules create tensions in society.
The compulsory hijab also affects the men — it is an insult to men that they cannot control their basic urges if they were to see a single strand of a woman’s hair.
In my country if you are not muslim if you are just a tourist you have no choice but to wear the hijab.
This should not be a secret but I really love my country. And it breaks my heart every time when I have to talk about the ugly parts …
the truth is Iran is a beautiful country but the government has imposed harsh conditions on women, treating them as second class citizens.
And today, although I am free from compulsory Hijab, it’s too hard for me to ignore the women who do not have that same freedom.
“Whenever in a free country the wind dances through my hair, I remember that this hair has been a hostage in the hands of Iranian regime for over 30 years.”
Last May, I started a Facebook page called My Stealthy Freedom. It was an opportunity for Iranian women to post their photos on this page without a headscarf or a hijab. The page has been hugely popular and has reached millions of people.
My Stealthy Freedom Facebook page Now has become the loudest voice against Hijab. We are not stealthy any more.
Ordinary photos from ordinary women; these women are not in the seat of power, women who were not politically active, women from cities and villages..women from all over Iran.
For those used to seeing Iranian women covered head to toe in a black veil, My Stealthy Freedom page shows another face of Iran.
The voice of Iranian women has been heard by the global media – newspapers and TV stations around the world have covered My Stealthy Freedom...
But the media in Iran have attacked these women on my stealthy freedom and even myself.
Iran state TV have reported in a news program that I was raped by 3 men after walking naked in streets of London!
You want to know what was the reaction of our politician?
No Iranian politician dares to support us.
Compulsory hijab is the one subject that all Iranian politicians agree on. It doesn't matter if they are reformist or conservative, moderate or hardline.
They all believe that those who object against forced hijab are breaking the law.
You want to know what was the reaction of the foreign politicians orotund the world?
No foreign politicians dares to support us.
It is rare for western politicians meeting with their Iranian counterparts to take up the cause of Iranian women.
because they believe objecting against forced hijab is breaking the law too.
What's even worse is that whenever a female politician from the West visits Iran, she conforms to the compulsory hijab rules. From Catherine Ashton to female officials from Sweden, Italy, Norway they all put on the hijab and they think they respect the culture of Iran. You really think that forcing women to wear hijab is our culture?
I am not suggesting that female politicians should interfere in Iran’s internal matters. But they should be aware that a significant part of Iranian women are rejecting this compulsory hijab.
You know, when Iranian officials visit a non-Islamic country, they insist that no alcohol be served at official dinners and their accompanying female team are in full hijab. No one in the West would dream of asking them to remove their hijabs to conform to Western norms.
So, why is it that when women officials from the west go to Iran they meekly accept hijab rules?
I am grateful for this award.
But I want to challenge western leaders who deal with Iranian officials to bring up the issue of Women's rights in Iran. I want female politicians to protest against compulsory hijab when they visit Iran. I want you to stand up for the dignity and the rights of Iranian women.
Some of you might say that Hijab is required by the law in Iran. But slavery used to be legal too. If no one had objected, then slavery would still be with us today.
Let us be in no doubt – Nowedays forcing women to wear compulsory hijab is discriminatory and it is unfair.
Like the leaders of the American civil rights movement, like Martin Luther King, we the women of my land also have a dream — we dream that one day our voice gets heard, the world stand up with us and compulsory hijab leaves Iran for ever.
Thank you,
Photos by: 
Oliver O'Hanlon
Masih Alinejad:'‎

UN Summit on human rights and democracy award given to My Stealthy Freedom Page
English and French translation below

متشکرم از اجلاس ژنو برای این جایزه، و این جایزه را به نام هزاران هزار زن ایرانی معترض به قوانین سرسختانه حجاب اجباری در ایران می پذیرم.

صادقانه بگویم، از آمدن به اینجا و دریافت این جایزه بسیار نگران بودم. چرا؟ چون وقتی یک نفر ایرانی در زمینۀ حقوق بشر فعالیت میکند، دولت ایران آن شخص را به همکاری با سرویسهای مخفی اسرائیلی، آمریکایی و یا انگلیسی متهم میکند. در ایران یک خبرنگار منتقد بودن به معنای زیستن با اتهاماتی همچون مزدگیر دولتهای خارجی است.

ولی چه مکانی بهتر از اینجا، جایی که میتوانیم به انتقاد از همۀ سوء استفاده کنندگان از حقوق بشر بپردازیم، چه در آمریکا باشند، چه در اسرائیل و چه در ایران.

.
من اهل ایرانم، کشوری که بهتر از هرجای دیگری می شناسم…

****
شما ممکن است عکسهایی از میشل اوباما بدون حجاب در عربستان سعودی را دیده باشید. عکسهایی که طوفان خبری بزرگی در رسانههای سراسر دنیا ایجاد کردند.
حالا مایلم رازی را با شما در میان بگذارم – اگر میشل اوباما قصد سفر به ایران را داشته باشد، یا باید موهایش را بپوشاند و یا نخواهد توانست از باجههای کنترل گذرنامه در فرودگاه جلوتر برود. البته چون او بانوی اول آمریکا است به دلیل بیحجابی به زندان نخواهد افتاد، ولی از کشور ایران اخراج خواهد شد. دلیل این امر این است که در ایران هیچ زنی بدون حجاب حق حضور در مکانهای‌ عمومی را ندارد.

افراد بسیاری به من میگویند که ایران دغدغههای بسیار بزرگتری دارد.
من از سال ۱۳۸۸ به پوشش خبری این دغدغههای بزرگتر نیز پرداختهام، من با خانوادههای بیش از ۵۰ نفر از افرادی که در تظاهرات اعتراضی به تقلبات صورت گرفته در انتخابات ریاست جمهوری در سال ۱۳۸۸ کشته شدند، مصاحبه کردهام.
برای مدتی طولانی، تنها کاری که میکردم نوشتن در مورد مرگ و اعدام و زندانی شدن فعالان سیاسی بود.
ولی وقتی از من میپرسند چرا برای یک تکه پارچه روسری انقدر سر و صدا میکنیم، پاسخ من این است که این یک تکه پارچه هم دغدغۀ بزرگی است. این یک تکه پارچه در دست دولتمردانی که به آزادی باور ندارند، به زنجیری تبدیل شده به دور گردن زنان ایرانی و بیش از ۳۵ سال است که زندگانی، زنده دلی و انرژی را در آنها خفه میکند.
به گفتۀ اسماعیل احمدی مقدم فرمانده نیروی انتظامی جمهوری اسلامی، تنها در سال گذشته نیروهای پلیس با ۳ میلیون و ۶۰۰ هزار زن به دلیل بدحجابی برخورد کردند و هجده هزار زن بازداشت و به دستگاه قضایی معرفی شدند. البته نیروهای انتظامی در مورد تعداد زنانی که به دلیل بدحجابی مورد ضرب و شتم قرار گرفتند، آماری جمعآوری نمیکند.
این یک تکه پارچه روسری در دستان رژیمی که حجاب اجباری را به صورت قانون کشوری وضع کرده، ابزاری است برای سرکوب زنان.

حجاب اجباری نیمی از جمعیت ایران را تحت تأثیرات خود قرار داده است. ممکن است اینطور فکر کنید که بسیاری از زنان ایرانی معقتد به حجابند، ولی بگذارید داستان خودم را برایتان بگویم تا به شما نشان دهم که چطور حجاب اجباری می‌تواند بر زندگی همۀ زنان – چه با حجاب و چه بدون حجاب – اثرگذار باشد.
من در یک روستای کوچک و در یک خانوادۀ سنتی و مذهبی متولد شدم. همۀ افراد خانوادۀ من از جمهوری اسلامی حمایت میکردند. پدر و دو برادرم در جنگ ایران و عراق مبارزه کردند.
مادرم همیشه با حجاب بود، و همچنین خواهرم، خالهها و عمههایم، و در حقیقت همۀ زنان خانوادهام با حجاب بودند.
من هم همچون میلیونها دختر ایرانی از سن هفت سالگی روسری اجباری را به سر کردم. وقتی شما در یک چنین جامعهای بزرگ میشوید، حجاب اجباری به بخشی از بدن شما، وبه هویت شما تبدیل میشود. شما به آسانی نمیتوانید آن را بردارید. برداشتن آن مانند این است که بخشی از وجود خودتان را بِبُرید.
و در نهایت، وقتی در سال ۲۰۰۹ ایران را به مقصد انگلستان ترک کردم، هنوز قادر نبودم روسریم را در ملاء عام از سر بردارم. برداشتن حجاب، وقتی این حجاب به مسالۀ شرف و نام نیک یک خانواده تبدیل میشود، آسان نیست.
پس بنابراین فردی که امروز در اینجا شما را مورد خطاب قرار میدهد، یک زن غربی نیست. من کسی هستم که مسیری طولانی را پیمودهام تا به اینجا رسیدهام. بگذارید بر روی یک مسأله تأکید کنم: من مخالف حجاب نیستم. چیزی که من با آن مخالفم، اجبار است… حجاب اجباری موجب تفرقه در خانواده و اجتماع میشود. و این قوانین، در جامعه ایجاد تنش میکنند.

حجاب اجباری بر مردان نیز تأثیرگذار است — توهینی است به مردان بر این اساس که در صورت دیدن یک تار موی زن، قادر به کنترل امیال اولیهشان نخواهند بود.
در کشور من، اگر شخصی مسلمان نباشد، مثلا یک گردشگر خارجی باشد، چارهای ندارد به جز بر سر کردن حجاب.
فکر نمیکنم مشخص نباشد، ولی من حقیقتاً عاشق کشورم هستم. و هر بار که از جنبههای منفی آن سخن میگویم، قلبم میشکند…
حقیقت این است که ایران کشوری است زیبا، ولی دولت شرایط سختی را بر زنان تحمیل کرده و با آنها همچون شهروندان درجه ۲ رفتار میکند.
و امروز، اگرچه من از قید حجاب اجباری آزادم، ولی برایم بسیار سخت است که زنانی را که از همین آزادی محروم هستند، نادیده بگیرم.
«هرگاه در کشوری آزاد باد در میان گیسوانم میرقصد، من به یاد میآورم که همین گیسوان برای بیش از ۳۰ سال در دستان رژیم جمهوری اسلامی گروگان بودهاند.»

در ماه مه سال گذشته من در فیس‌بوک صفحه‌ای راهاندازی کردم به نام «My Stealthy Freedom — آزادی یواشکی زنان در ایران». این فرصتی بود برای زنان ایرانی تا عکسهایشان را بدون روسری و یا حجاب به اشتراک بگذارند. این صفحه بسیار پرطرفدار شده و مورد توجه میلیونها نفر قرار گرفته است.
صفحۀ فیس‌بوک آزادی یواشکی هم اکنون به بلندترین صدای مخالف با حجاب تبدیل شده. ما دیگر یواشکی نیستیم.
عکسهای معمولی از زنان معمولی؛ این زنان در مسند قدرت نیستند، زنانیاند که فعالیت سیاسی نداشتهاند، زنانی از شهرها و روستاها… زنی از همه جای ایران.
برای آنان که عادت کردهاند زنان ایرانی را از سر تا پا در پوششی سیاه ببینند، صفحۀ آزادی یواشکی چهرهای دیگر از ایران را نشان میدهد.
صدای زنان ایرانی به گوش رسانههای سراسر جهان رسیده – روزنامهها و شبکههای تلویزیونی در تمام دنیا «آزادی یواشکی» را پوشش دادهاند.
ولی رسانههای داخل ایران این زنان صفحۀ آزادی یواشکی و حتی خود من را مورد حمله قرار دادهاند. تلویزیون دولتی ایران در برنامهای خبری گزارش کرده بود که من پس از برهنه قدم زدن در خیابانهای لندن توسط سه مرد مورد تجاوز قرار گرفتم!

مایلید بدانید عکسالعمل سیاستمداران ما چه بود؟
هیچ سیاستمدار ایرانی جرأت حمایت از ما را ندارد.
حجاب اجباری تنها موضوعی است که تمامی سیاستمداران ایرانی در آن توافق دارند. فرقی نمیکند که اصلاح طلب باشند و یا محافظه کار، میانهرو و یا تندرو. آنها همگی معتقدند که کسانی که به حجاب اجباری اعتراض میکنند، قانونشکن هستند.

مایلید بدانید عکسالعمل سیاستمداران خارجی سراسر دنیا چه بود؟
هیچ سیاستمدار خارجی جرأت حمایت از ما را ندارد.
اتفاق نادری است که سیاستمداران غربی در دیدار با همتاهای ایرانی خود مسألۀ زنان ایرانی را پیش بکشند. چرا که آنها نیز معتقدند اعتراض کردن به حجاب اجباری قانونشکنی است.
بدتر از آن اینست که هرگاه یک سیاستمدار زن غربی به ایران سفر میکند، به قوانین حجاب اجباری تن در میدهد. از کاترین اشتون تا مقامات رسمی زن از سوئد، ایتالیا و نروژ، همگی حجاب بر سر میکنند و فکر میکنند که با این کار به فرهنگ ایران احترام میگذارند. آیا شما واقعاً فکر میکنید که مجبور کردن زنان به پوشیدن حجاب اجباری فرهنگ ماست؟
پیشنهاد من این نیست که زنان سیاستمدار خارجی در امور داخلی ایران دخالت کنند. ولی آنها باید به این مسأله آگاه باشند که بخش قابل توجهی از زنان ایرانی این حجاب اجباری را رد میکنند.
میدانید، وقتی سیاستمداران ایرانی به کشوری غیر مسلمان سفر میکنند، مصرانه تقاضا میکنند که هیچگونه مشروب الکلی در مراسم شامهای رسمی سرو نشود و تیم زنان همراهشان حجاب کامل داشته باشند. هیچکس در غرب حتی تصورش را هم نمیتواند بکند که از آنها بخواهد در احترام و مطابقت با هنجارهای غربی حجابشان را بردارند.
پس چرا وقتی مقامات رسمی زن از غرب به ایران میروند، به سادگی قوانین حجاب را میپذیرند؟

من از بابت این جایزه قدردانم.

ولی مایلم رهبران کشورهای غربی را که با مقامات ایرانی سر و کار دارند به چالش بکشم تا مسألۀ حقوق زنان در ایران را مطرح کنند. از زنان سیاستمدار میخواهم که وقتی به ایران سفر میکنند، به حجاب اجباری اعتراض کنند. از شما میخواهم که برای منزلت و حقوق زنان ایرانی به پا خیزید.

برخی از شما ممکن است بگویید که حجاب در ایران قانونی است، ولی بردهداری نیز زمانی قانونی بود. اگر هیچکس اعتراض نمیکرد، در اینصورت بردهداری همچنان امروز نیز برجا میبود.

پس شک نداشته باشیم – امروزه مجبور کردن زنان به پوشش و حجاب اجباری تبعیض آمیز و ناعادلانه است.

همانند رهبران جنبش حقوق مدنی در آمریکا، همانند مارتین لوتر کینگ، ما زنان ایران نیز رویایی داریم — رویای ما این است که روزی صدایمان شنیده شود، جهان با ما بایستد و حجاب اجباری از ایران برای همیشه رخت برگیرد.

متشکرم،